Tag: Hollander Stoff Market

British Tweed Cowl Neck Dress

This is Burdastyle #118A 10/2012 and the first version of my Anglomania dress. I made this dress using British tweed wool with a herringbone pattern bought from the Hollander Stoffe Market, when it swung by my local town a couple of years ago.

Burdastyle #118A 10/2012
Burdastyle #118A 10/2012

I love using British wool tweeds. The fabrics are so warm to wear and durable. I throw this dress in the washing machine on a wool wash and it’s fine – it just gets softer and more comfortable with each wash! (BTW – not sure if this is recommended. I suggest checking with your retailer before you throw your precious wool fabric in the washing machine!)

Back view
Back view

I also love the richness of the colours. From afar it appears to be greenish blue, but on closer inspection, it has flecks of many other colours within it!

Herringbone tweed
Herringbone tweed

This fabric is just a little thicker and sturdier than the tartan wool that I used for the Anglomania dress and I think it holds the shape of the side gathers and cowl just a little bit better.

British tweed wool fabric
British tweed wool fabric

Anglomania dress in tartan merino wool
Anglomania dress in tartan merino wool

I didn’t line this tweed dress, I chose instead to do a Hong Kong finish on the seams.

Hong Kong finish on seams
Hong Kong finish on seams

I also hand stitched the hem and sleeve hems.

Back view and Hong Kong finished seams
Back view and Hong Kong finished seams and invisible zip

I really like the shape of the dress, especially the gathering at the front, as it hides a multitude of postpartum unruliness! It’s also interesting experimenting with the same dress pattern and using different fabrics to create quite different looking dresses.

Same pattern - different fabrics = quite different looks
Same pattern – different fabrics = quite different looks

Apologies for all of the dress form pics of this, but I’ve been too busy out testing the seaworthiness of this beauty below with my children, to do any dress ‘modeling’!

P1290825I have many projects on my sewing table at the moment that I’ll hopefully be sharing soon. First up is some Carnival goodness for my children.

What’s on your sewing table right now?

Have a good weekend!

Project Sewn Week Three – ‘If the shoe fits’

It’s week three of Project Sewn and this week’s theme is ‘If the shoe fits’.

The designer contestants have come up with knock-out clothes and images again! It’s so inspiring to see their interpretations of the themes and how expertly they put their looks together. They truly are a talented bunch of ladies!

For the rest of us mere mortals, I think it’s great that we get to join in with the fun. This week though, I thought I’d have to bow out because I’m busy making for my children and haven’t had time to make something for this challenge.

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Sparkly ballet flats

Then, just as luck would have it, a trawl through my archives unearthed these photos taken in Italy last summer of an outfit not yet blogged about, which also happens to showcase this sparkly pair of ballet flats quite nicely.

So I thought, ‘if the shoe fits’……!

Grainline Studio Scout tee and Simplicity skirt
Grainline Studio Scout tee and Simplicity skirt and unknown furry friend!

This outfit is made up of a Cynthia Rowley Simplicity 2215 skirt and Grainline Studio woven Scout tee topped off with a Smedley knit.

P1260252The Simplicity 2215 skirt is a pleated skirt pattern with uneven pleats on the front and back pieces and pockets in the side seams.

Simplicity skirt
Simplicity 2215 skirt with uneven pleating and side seam pockets

Once you’ve marked out and basted down the pleating, this skirt comes together really quickly and easily – with just one catch! I found putting the zip and the pocket into the side seam a little perplexing. I managed to put them all in in the end by attaching the zip to the side of the pocket but it wasn’t the neatest of zip insertions!

Organic cotton batiste lining
Organic cotton batiste lining

The main body of the skirt is made from linen from the Hollander Stoff market and I lined the skirt with organic cotton batiste from Lebenskleidung.  I added a fabric covered button to close the waistband and zip fastening and hand stitched the hem for a neater finish.

Grainline Studio Scout tee in cotton eyelet batiste
Grainline Studio Scout tee in cotton eyelet batiste

The Grainline Studio Scout woven tee is one of my all-time favourite staple patterns! It’s so versatile and easy and can be squeezed out of just one metre of fabric – always a bonus IMO! I’ve made several of these now but this white one and my Breton striped one are the most worn.

Body of Scout tee underlined with white cotton batiste and all French seams
Body of Scout tee underlined with white cotton batiste and all French seams

For this tee, I used cotton eyelet batiste and underlined the main body pieces with cotton batiste – both from Anita Pavani Stoffe and did French seams on all seams including the armholes.

This cotton eyelet batiste is the same as I used to make my first Anna dress in black. I really love this fabric, which is why I was so pleased when I saw a blouse recently, made from the same fabric in a boutique in my town by Italian brand 0039 Italy for 150 euros! Mine cost a fraction of that to make! Isn’t it great when that happens!

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Don’t forget to cast your vote for your favourite outfit over at Project Sewn.

I’m so looking forward to the finale of the competition next week. What will the contestants pull out of the bag for that one, I wonder?

The Schwarzwald Skirt Collection Autumn/Winter 2013 – Skirt Two -‘Forest Foliage’

This is the second skirt from my ‘Black  Forest’ skirt collection using Burdastyle 12/2012 #105 skirt pattern. This pattern has only two pattern pieces, is beginner friendly and can be made from less than one metre of fabric which make it pretty fab IMO!

Burdastyle skirt pattern 12/2012 #105
Burdastyle skirt pattern 12/2012 #105

The autumn coloured leaves in the forest inspired me so this skirt is aptly named ‘Forest Foliage’.

The Black Forest foliage, Germany
The Black Forest foliage, Germany

I used a wool knit by Italian designer Missoni bought at this year’s Hollander Stoff Markt in Germany. I love the autumnal colours!

P1280743 I wasn’t sure whether a wool knit would work for this pattern but I didn’t alter anything and it seems fine. Phew!

P1280729 I used the same Petersham ribbon for the waistband as I did for my first version of this skirt. I also lined it with a viscose lining using the same pattern pieces as the outer fabric.

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My main concern with this fabric was whether I could match the stripes up at the seams, but I think I just about pulled it off on the side seams!

The misbehaving back seam!
The misbehaving back seam!

The stripes on the back seam with the zip refused to play nicely though! I unpicked the zip a few times but couldn’t get those deviant stripes to behave themselves and sewing invisible zips into wool knits isn’t a barrel of laughs I can tell you! Finally I surrendered to the wonky stripes!

Clingy fit!
Clingy fit!

Overall I’m happy with how this skirt turned out! The fabric is really comfy to wear and importantly for this time of year, it’s also cosy and warm! The fit of the skirt in the knit is a bit clingier than the other two skirts I’ve made from this pattern – as you can see in this semi-action photo above.

A bonus of using the Missoni fabric was that I could use the selvedge edge as the hem which eliminated a step in the sewing process and speeded up the making of this skirt. Much appreciated! Cheers Missoni!

To round off this ‘Black Forest’ skirt collection, I’ll post the final of the skirt trio next week. Until then, here’s a sneak peak of ‘Twinkle, Twinkle Little Skirt’!

'Twinkle, Twinkle Little Skirt'
‘Twinkle, Twinkle Little Skirt’

Later!

Christine

Burdastyle #130 10/2013 Coat Muslin

This year I thought I’d give coat-making another go and chose this pattern.

Burdastyle #130 10/2013 coat pattern
Burdastyle #130 10/2013 coat pattern

I chose this because:

1 – The pattern is in short sizes 17-21.

Burdastyle has two pattern sizing charts – size 34-52 designed for women height 168cm and short fitting sizes 17-26 for women height 160cm. I’m 162cm, so short sizing – CHECK!

2 – According to Burdastyle this coat pattern is designed for women with small busts and wider hips – so again – CHECK!

3 – Burdastyle also recommends using a patterned stripe fabric and I’m using this:-

'Chanel' wool coating fabric
‘Chanel’ wool coating fabric

So again – CHECK!

I bought this fabric at this year’s autumn Hollander Stoff Market in Karlsruhe, Germany and the vendor assured me that it’s by designer, Chanel. Not sure if this is really true but the guy who told me this does have designer fabrics so maybe it is, but either way, I really like it.

I’d decided to replace the hook and eye fastenings used in the pattern for a double ended zip because for a winter coat, that just makes more sense to me.

Stripe 'Chanel' wool coating fabric with zip options
Stripe ‘Chanel’ wool coating fabric with zip options

So far so good! I thought I’d hit upon a perfectly designed pattern for me and my fabric.

The thing I was wary about was the gathering on the skirt. How would that work in thick wool, I wondered?

I thought it wise to do a coat muslin first and thanks to a tip from Crab and Bee , this old bed sheet has now been reborn!

old bed sheet used to make coat muslin
old bed sheet used to make coat muslin

But check out that gathering! Words fail me! Next time, I’m going to ignore the model pictures in Burdastyle magazine because on one page the model is wearing the coat for shorties (height 160cm/5ft 3ins) and on the other page she’s wearing a top designed for taller women (height 176cm/5ft 9ins) and she looks good in both! Go figure!

I include the following shot for your entertainment only!

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l know, I know, I look like an extra from the Harrison Ford movie ‘Witness’!

And just to tickle your funny bones even more, here’s a back shot!

P1280371So happy now that I only subjected an old bed sheet to this and not my precious wool!

On the upside, the fit of the bodice is quite good so I’ve cut the extra peplum pattern pieces to make this jacket instead:-

Burdastyle #129 10/2013
Burdastyle #129 10/2013

Only question now is, do I still use the same fabric, bearing in mind that I have just less than three metres of it? Or do I use that for another longer coat and if so, which pattern?

I think this wool would be nice as this jacket and maybe I could squeeze a skirt out of what’s left.

What do you think? I’d be very grateful for suggestions, thanks!

Baby, it’s cold outside! Coat Review Burdastyle #103 10/2012

P1280316It’s minus ridiculous degrees here and like lots of other blogging sewists in the northern hemisphere, I’m turning my sewing attention to outerwear and warm and cosy things!

This is a wrap coat that I made last year from Burdastyle pattern #103 10/2012.

Burdastyle #103 10/2012
Burdastyle #103 10/2012

You need a double-sided fabric or at least a fabric with a decent looking reverse side to make this unlined coat because the reverse of the fabric shows on the huge collar. I used a dense, slightly felted wool knit fabric that I found at the Hollander Stoff Market and even though I needed the best part of three metres to make this, the coat is still lightweight.

Coat worn with hand-knitted cowl from
Coat worn with a cowl that I knitted

The construction of the coat was relatively easy. The only challenging part for me was hemming around the outer edge and getting the mitered corners finished off nicely. A quick check of my ‘Reader’s Digest – Complete Guide to Sewing’ on mitering soon remedied that though – it’s easy when you know how!

Side-seam pockets
Side-seam pockets

The pattern has some nice design features such as the side in-seam pockets and front shaping darts.

In-seam side pockets and collar
In-seam side pockets and collar

As is often the case for me with Burdastyle, the sizing was a bit generous. This is the smallest size 36 and the fit is ok on the shoulders, but I feel this style swamps my smaller frame. I didn’t alter anything, although the sleeves need shortening by a good five centimetres – I’ve just got them turned in here.

widen self fabric belt
widen self fabric belt

I’m not satisfied with the self fabric belt either – I think widening it would make it look better, it just isn’t balanced as it is.

I hope I’ll have better luck next time! I’m finishing off a coat muslin that I’ll post later this week.

Have you made a coat this winter? Are you happy with how it turned out?

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