Tag: France

Happy 2014 and ‘Twinkle, Twinkle Little Skirt’!

Happy 2014 everyone! I hope you’ve all had a ‘Guten Rutsch’ (good slide) into the New Year, as they say in these parts!

I’m posting this skirt review later than I’d planned. Holiday travel, sick children and other seasonal distractions completely derailed my blog posting schedule at the end of 2013 and thus far this year – but I’m British, so I’m keeping calm and carrying on regardless!

This is Skirt Three of my ‘Schwarzwald Autumn/Winter 2013 skirt trio collection made from BurdaStyle skirt pattern 12/2012 #105.

BurdaStyle 12/2012 skirt pattern in sequin wool fabric
BurdaStyle 12/2012 skirt pattern in sequin wool fabric

The Schwarzwald inspiration for this skirt was the beautiful and sparkly frosts we get here in the Black Forest in winter.

Frosty Black Forest in Germany
Frosty Black Forest in Germany

To combat said chilly frosts, I made this skirt out of a thick wool fabric with a sequin top layer bought from Canepa Spa Outlet – the factory shop of Canepa Spa Italian designer fabric manufacturer at Lake Como, Italy.

Wool from Canepa Spa Outlet, Lake Como, Italy
Wool from Canepa Spa Outlet, Lake Como, Italy

The wool keeps me toasty warm even on the frostiest days. However the thick sparkly fabric adds bulk where I’d rather not highlight bulkiness and so if I were to make another sparkly skirt, I would definitely choose a slinkier sparkly fabric with better drape!

bulky fabric highlights all lumps and bumps!
bulky fabric highlights all lumps and bumps!

No need to ask ‘Does my bum look big in this?’, I already have the big, shiny answer!

Anyway, moving on!

Again this skirt pattern was super simple to make even in this thick wool although the invisible zip that I put in the back centre seam has misbehaved a bit and keeps jamming in the wool. I may have to replace this at some point.

Viscose lining and ribbon waistband
Viscose lining and ribbon waistband

I lined the skirt with a viscose lining and used more of the Mokuba grosgrain ribbon that I used for the other two skirts as the waistband with an invisible zip in the back centre seam with a hook and eye closing at the top.

Frumpy length?
Frumpy length?

I hand-stitched the hem after pondering for some time about ways to finish the hem off nicely. After I’d finished the skirt, I spotted a sparkly skirt on my travels in Zadig and Voltaire in France. For their version, they left the hem raw and the poly lining of the skirt protruded down below the hem a couple of centimetres, frayed for about a centimetre at the end, which gave the bottom of the skirt a softened look and also made it edgy looking. I prefer this finish so if I make this skirt over, I’d finish the hem like Zadig and Voltaire did.

Frumpy length?
Frumpy length?

The other main difference between their skirt and mine apart from the huge price tag of the Zadig one! is the length – Zadig and Voltaire’s skirt is fashionably mini.

'Twinkle, Twinkle Little Skirt'
‘Twinkle, Twinkle Little Skirt’

Despite my skirt being a frumpy length and exaggerating all my lumps and bumps, it does keep me warm and the magpie in me does like the way the fabric sparkles!

Have you made anything that may not have been the most flattering thing for you but you liked it and wore it anyway??

Review of Wiksten Tank pattern

A linen Wiksten Tank on tour in Italy
Wiksten Tank on tour in Italy

To kick off this blog, I’m starting with a review of the infamous Wiksten Tank top pattern which I actually made last year but haven’t got round to blogging about until now.

This was a really simple, quick and easy pattern to make.  Jenny Gordy, the designer of Wiksten patterns, gives very straightforward and clear instructions which are accompanied by photos to guide you through every step of the making process.

Apart from the foolproof instructions in the patterns, the real genius of Jenny’s designs are how basic they are and how seamlessly they can blend into every wardrobe.  The pattern comes in two lengths – tank top and ‘dress’ – although I would describe the dress as a tunic.  They can be made up in a variety of fabrics, each giving them a unique look and purpose.

On the downside, I don’t think that this top is particularly flattering on my body shape.  It’s cut quite low at the front so I have to double tank it to make it decent!  It’s probably more suitable for people more generously endowed than myself.  When I make this pattern again, I’ll raise the front neckline a few centimetres.

The fabric I used for this top is a lovely lightweight linen that I got online at France Duval-Stalla.  As the name suggests, this is a French store that stocks many organic quality and Made in France fabrics.  The quality of the linen is excellent – lightweight enough for a summer  top but substantial enough so that it is not too sheer and see-through, which is just as well because it wasn’t very cheap.  However so far it’s wearing well.  It’s been thrown in the washing machine several times and is still looking crisp and white so hopefully it was money well spent.

Overall, I’m really happy with this top.  It was a satisfying and easy make and a good basic addition to my summer wardrobe.

Christine

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